Flat Aggie visits our farm

We had a visitor at our farm this week. He didn’t eat much, didn’t take up much room, but wanted to learn about what we do. His name is Flat Aggie, and he’s a project that was started by a teacher in California.

Many people are aware of Flat Stanley, the popular children’s book that follows the adventures of a paper man. This project is very similar, except the teacher sends Flat Aggie to farms across the country, hoping to learn through Flat Aggie’s travels all about what happens on the farm.

So what did Flat Aggie learn about on our farm? He helped with tagging our heifers with their cow tags. (To learn more about what the cow tags mean, such as their color, read more here.) For our heifers, that’s kind of like being adopted. When we switch out their calf tag with a cow tag, we’re including them in our herd.

A simple hair cut around the ears helps us see the cow tag better. Notice how the number on the left is much easier to see than the number on the right? Thanks, Flat Aggie, for the help!

A simple hair cut around the ears helps us see the cow tag better. Notice how the number on the left is much easier to see than the number on the right? Thanks, Flat Aggie, for the help!

While we were tagging the heifers, Flat Aggie also helped us trim the hair growing in the cattle’s ears. This makes it easier to see the tag numbers when we are working with the cattle. It’s important that we’re able to know which cow we’re dealing with from a distance, so that we can keep track of health, calving progress, etc.

This heifer (meaning she's going to have her first calf soon) is trading her yellow calf tag in for a blue cow tag!

This heifer (meaning she’s going to have her first calf soon) is trading her yellow calf tag in for a blue cow tag!

The last thing Flat Aggie helped us with was giving pre-calving vaccinations. For our cattle, this is very important for the health of the unborn calf. Think of it as a pregnant woman getting a flu shot. The risk of being ill while pregnant, or immediately after the baby is born is greater than the minimal risk of the vaccination. In cattle, even more so.

Before she goes back to eating her breakfast, this heifer gets a shot that will help protect her unborn calf from illness.

Before she goes back to eating her breakfast, this heifer gets a shot that will help protect her unborn calf from illness.

The best part of having Flat Aggie visit our farm? Being able to see things from another perspective. Having to figure out how to explain what we do so that a student could understand was a real eye-opening experience. And it’s great to connect to others across the country that are interested in what we do, but really have no way of finding out, other than through activities like this.

Did it take a little time? Of course. Was it worth it? Without a doubt.

Flat Aggie will be moving on to his next farm, learning his next lesson, sharing his next story. But you don’t need to have a piece of paper to encourage you to share your story. You can do it all on your own.

Trust me, people are wanting to hear what you have to say…you just have to take the step to share it.

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Flat Aggie visits our farm

  1. Thank you for sharing Flat Aggie with us. I know when I post something about our farm/ranch I try to think outside of the description box. Just because many of my readers know about a given subject doesn’t mean all of the readers do – so I really try to stop and think and word stories so all can understand what we do at NoDak Herefords. You reminded me, I need to get the new tags made for our heifers too. Calving begins in a week or so and I am NOT ready for the nightly 3 AM checks that I take. Oh well, part of the job. 😉

  2. Scott & White Clinic is a large healthcare organization that sees over 2 million patients a year in their many regional clinics. They know all agriculture workers need to take good care of their health because ag jobs are often working hard outdoors in all kinds of weather. Since it’s flu season – and it’s really bad here in Texas right now – we thought Flat Aggie should get checked out by Dr. Terry Rascoe who has patients who are farmers and ranchers. Dr. Rascoe gave Flat Aggie a flu shot (everyone should get one!) and, just to be sure, ran a test to make sure Flat Aggie didn’t have flat worms. All clear! Flat Aggie is scheduled for pick up this afternoon by the owner of Fleming Grain and Cattle. Enough of the city life – back to the farm for Flat Aggie!

  3. I am sooo glad Flat Aggie came to visit y’all ! My husband and I are about to experience our very first year of having calves drop – and I am a pure wreck! No kidding.. worse than my own first pregnancy! I’m in the middle of prepping for our Vet to come out and just… nail everybody at one time, as much as possible! And I never even considered trimming ears before tagging. But it makes total sense! Lord knows, I get enough of that, “you know where you can go” look!

  4. Pingback: Touring a Sawmill in Northern California VIDEO - a colorful adventure

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s