Losing the farm

No, we’re not losing our farm…and I hope we never have to face that kind of hardship, but unfortunately I know too many that have.

As I read headlines and articles regarding the devastating flooding in the south, I can’t help but think of those to the north of us. Although Louisiana, Missouri and other southern states are undergoing some drastic water issues right now, those in the Devils Lake area have been fighting these same types of issues for years. The only difference has been timing.

I wonder which would be easier…watching your hard work disappear in the blink of an eye, knowing that there is nothing you can do about it, or watching slowly, year after year, as the water creeps steadily closer? Knowing that there are answers and resources available to stop (or at least slow down) the advancement of the water, but not be able to access those resources? Knowing that local, state and federal government is well aware of what’s happening, people come and tour your devastation, and yet nothing is done.

How would that feel?

Would it be better to lose your farmland in a flash of water? A wave that washes over your land, wiping it clean like a slate, but then having the opportunity to reclaim and rebuild what you once had? Or watch as the water claims the land that you once farmed, lived on, called home…knowing that you may never be able to return to it again?

Unfortunately, both are realities. And not only are the landowners and the farmers the losers in this battle. Each and every one of us has a stake and are hurt when farmland is lost.

As the world’s population continues to grow, those involved in farming and acres available to farm are on a decline. Losing thousands of acres to flooding isn’t going to help matters any.

Hopefully the water will recede quickly in the south, and we’ll be able to reclaim some of that fertile ground. But the answer for those in the Devils Lake area seems to be further off…and the longer it takes, the more we’ll ALL be hurting.

It may not seem like much now, but it’s a pain we should ALL be sharing in…and ALL be trying to find a solution.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Losing the farm

  1. I hear ya sister. I’m in IN and my hometown suffered pretty bad flooding a few years ago on top of the constant creep of water into farmland. What really doesn’t help is good farmland being sold off and developed. It’s one reason why I’m glad that our county is actually letting our paved (in theory) road go back to gravel, it’ll hopefully discourage developers and leave our farmland to us farmers.

  2. It is so hard to imagine how devastating it can be whether it is a slow loss or overnight. (By the way, clicking the like button didn’t mean I liked the dilemma. Love ya girl & thanks for the shoutout link.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s